Greg Thornton has sold a property at 19579 Thorburn WAY in Pitt Meadows.

Congratulations Rick and Brenda on the purchase of your new home!

 

Quality built home by Foxridge Homes premiere design in Osprey Village in show home condition. 3 bedrooms with large ensuite. Great room could be 4th bdrm. Home features 3 bathrooms. Enjoy large backyard fully fenced with stamped concretepatio, garden shed. This home is perfect for someone with children. Home features built-in alarm system, gas fireplace, built-in vacuum, 12 foot vaulted ceiling in dining & master bdrm. 10 ft ceilings throughout and 4 ft crawl space for ample storage. Easy commute with access to Golden Bridge and Lougheed Hwy. Walk to Bonson Landing conveniences.

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For the past 49 years, the Real Estate Board of Greater Vancouver has celebrated the distinguished achievement of its top-producing members on MLS whit the Medallion and President's Club Award. The 2013 Medallion Club qualifiers are selected from the top 10 percent of Greater Vancouver Realtors. 

 

The Board recognizes the accomplishments of top producers every year through the Medallion Club. These achievers are in the top 10 per cent and excel in combined MLS® listings, sales and dollar volume. Each year Medallion members are honoured for their efforts and accomplishments.

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As part of our technology strategy and remaining as your #1 choice in Real Estate, we have purchased our very own UAV Drone (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle).  This is not just an expensive toy, our drone has a 3,280 feet range a 2K resolution camcorder and requires a flight plan to be filed with transport Canada before use.

 

We will now be able to Market our listings better than ever, creating incredible videos that evoke an emotional response like the one you see below.  This is the newest and most sophisticated technology in real estate marketing today.

 

 

 

We do not believe in keeping with trends we are creating them.  'Modern Day Marketing Techniques with Old Fashion Service".  #DoesYourRealtorDrone ?

 

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Our NEWEST Perminent Page ! : http://thethorntongroup.ca/2-5-10-new-home-warranty-insurance.html

 

1. How you are protected
 
In BC, new home warranty insurance covers three aspects of home construction:
 
• two years on labour and materials (some limits apply)
• five years on building envelope, and
• 10 years on the structure.
 
 
2. Manufacturers' Warranties

 
Many building components come with a warranty from the product manufacturer that extends beyond the mandatory home warranty insurance coverage period. For example, flooring, cabinets, windows, plumbing fixtures and fittings may come with a separate manufacturer's warranty. Ask the builder for copies of any manufacturer's warranties and review the coverage they offer. These warranties may be in the name of the builder, so find out if you need to have the warranty transferred to you.
 
3. What 2-5-10 Coverage Includes

Mandatory home warranty insurance is for three different time periods, covering three different aspects of home construction:
 -two years on labour and materials (some limits apply),
 -five years on the building envelope, including water penetration, and
 -10 years on the structure.
 
This is often referred to as "2-5-10" coverage.
 
4. 2-year Materials and Labour Warranty

The minimum warranty coverage for labour and materials is two years and includes:
 
• any defect in materials and labour or violation of the Building Code* as follows:
   12 months for all new homes, other than the common property of a strata corporation
   15 months for the common property of strata corporations

• defects in materials and labour supplied for the electrical, plumbing, heating, ventilation and air conditioning delivery systems, as well as for the exterior cladding, caulking, windows and doors, that may lead to detachment or material damage to the new home and violation of the Building Code*:
 
*To be covered, a violation of the Building Code must constitute an unreasonable health or safety risk, or cause (or be likely to cause) material damage to the new home.

24 months for all new homes, including the common property of strata corporations
 
5. 5 Year Building Envelope Warranty

The building envelope includes the components that separate the indoors from the outdoors, including the exterior walls, foundation, roof, windows and doors. The minimum warranty coverage is five years for defects in the building envelope of a new home, including a defect that permits unintended water penetration such that it causes, or is likely to cause, material damage to the new home.
 
6. 10 Year Building Structural Defects Warranty

The minimum warranty coverage is 10 years for defects in materials and labour that result in the failure of a load-bearing part of the new home, and for any defect that causes structural damage that materially and adversely affects the use of the new home for residential occupancy.

The terms of the coverage define what each general category includes. Read the policy document details carefully to be sure you understand what your home warranty insurance covers, and call your warranty insurance provider if you have any questions.
 
7. 2-5-10 as a Minimum

The requirement for a minimum 2-5-10 warranty insurance policy cannot be waived by any separate contract between you and the builder. The Homeowner Protection Act allows for home warranty insurance policies that exceed the minimum 2-5-10 period, but does not permit anything less.
 
8. When 2-5-10 Coverage Begins

Each of the different time period coverages will commence on the same date. Starting dates for home warranty insurance coverage are critical, because you calculate the date on which the coverage expires by counting from the starting date. The precise starting date will depend on a number of factors.
 
• Single detached dwellings (non-strata):
contract or custom homes (built on land owned by the homeowner): date of first occupancy, date of occupancy permit, or date the home was completed and ready for occupancy, whichever comes first.
 
• Spec homes (built on land that was owned by the builder or developer): date of first occupancy or date of transfer of legal title to first owner, whichever comes first.

• Strata homes: date of first occupancy or date of transfer of legal title to first owner, whichever comes first common property: date of first unit occupancy in strata building or date of transfer of legal title to first owner in building, whichever comes first.
 
9. Buying a Resale Home with Home Warranty Insurance

If you buy an existing or resale home that is covered by a policy of home warranty insurance, the coverage remains with the new home until the expiry of the 2-5-10 coverages. All of the applicable benefits under home warranty insurance that have not expired are available to any subsequent owners. You or your lawyer should review the policy documents before completing the sale to be sure you know how long any existing coverage extends. At the time of the sale, the existing owner should give the new owner the policy documents as well as the maintenance manual (if one was provided to the original purchaser) and other applicable care/ operating manuals from manufacturers and warranties for appliances, products or systems.
 
 
 
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“You never get a second chance at a first impression.”  We’ve all heard this expression before.  And now, while you are preparing your house to sell, it should not be far from your mind. 

 

While logical factors such as price and location narrow the pool of houses a potential buyer will look at, the ultimate decision to buy a particular house is fuelled by a mixture of logic and emotion.  And emotion often wins out.  The same might be said for the process of selling a home.  For this reason, Real Estate Agents, when they talk to you about buying real estate, will refer to your purchase as a “home.”  When discussing the sale of your current home, however, an agent will refer to it as the “house.”  This is a conscious choice.  The agent knows that buying a house is often an emotional decision, while, when selling a house, emotion should be separated from the process. 

 

Buyers are searching for a “home”—a place in which they will feel comfortable, secure, and happy, a place in which they can imagine settling down and raising their family.  As a seller, your goal is to cultivate these feelings through the property you’re selling.  Look at your house as a marketable commodity.  A buyer’s emotional response is triggered early, so you want to ensure you have done everything you can to encourage a positive response to your house from the outset.  Within minutes—even seconds—of pulling into your driveway, buyers have formed an impression that they will carry with them through the rest of the showing, and beyond.  Keep in mind, this impression will not only influence whether or not they make an offer, but also what they consider to be the value of the property.    

 

If you’ve ever visited model homes, you’re familiar with effective presentation styles.  Have you ever walked into one of these homes and immediately begun taking stock, planning how to get your home to look that good?  Well, now is the time to take some of these steps.  Of course, there are ways to achieve the same effect in your own home without incurring model home costs.   

 

When homes create this immediate type of emotional appeal, they tend to sell quickly—and for more money.  Use the following step-by-step guide to get your house into selling shape before you put the property on the market, and you’ll be well on your way to a successful sale!

 

  1. 1.      Depersonalize.

 

This should be one of your first steps when you begin preparing your house to sell.  Over the years, a home inevitably becomes tattooed with the owners’ lives, covered with touches that have made it that special place for you.  At this point, however, you want buyers to recognize it as a property they could make into their unique place.  When a homebuyer walks into a room and sees these personalizing touches—such as photos on the walls or trophy collections—their ability to picture their own lives in this room is jarred, impairing a positive emotional response.  So, your first step will be to remove all the family photos, the trophies, collectible items, and souvenirs.  Pack them all together, so you’ll have everything you need at your disposal when it comes time to personalize your new home. For the time being, rent a storage space and keep these items there.  Do not simply transfer these items to another place in your house.  Do not hoard them away in a closet, basement, attic, or garage, as the next step in preparing your home is to minimize clutter—and these areas of your house will all be targeted.

 

  1. 2.      Remove all clutter.

 

The next step on the list is to purge your house of the excess items that have accumulated over the years.  This is the hardest part for many people, as they have an emotional investment in many of these things.  When you have lived in a house for several years, a build-up of personal effects occurs that is often so gradual that you don’t notice the space is becoming cluttered.  If you need to, bring in an objective friend to help point out areas that could stand to be cleared.  Try to stand back yourself and see your house as a buyer might.  Survey shelves, countertops, drawers, closets, the basement—all places where clutter often accumulates—to determine what needs to go.  Use a system to help you decide:  get rid of all items, for example, you haven’t used in the past five years, and pack up everything that you haven’t used in the past year.  Although getting rid of some things might be hard, try to do it without conscience or remorse.  You’ll be forced to go through this process anyway when you move, and with each box you eliminate, your storage space—and the room in general—begins to look larger.  We’ve broken down the process into specific areas of your house to help you concentrate your efforts:

 

Kitchen:

The kitchen is an ideal place to begin, as it’s easy to spot and eliminate the type of clutter that tends to accumulate here.  Homebuyers will open your drawers and cabinets as they’ll want to check if there will be enough room for their own belongings.  If the drawers appear cluttered and crowded, this will give them the impression there is not enough space.  

 

  • First of all, remove everything from the counters, even the toaster (the toaster can be stored in a cabinet, and brought out when needed).
  • Clean out all the cabinets and drawers.  Put aside all of the dishes, pots and pans that you rarely use, then box them and put them in the storage unit you have rented (again, not in the basement or a closet).
  • If you, like many people, have a “junk drawer,” clear this out.
  • Get rid of the food items in the pantry that you don’t use.  Begin to use up existing food—let what you have on your shelves dictate your menus from now on.
  • Remove all extra cleaning supplies from the shelves beneath the sink.  Make sure this area is as empty as possible.  You should thoroughly clean this spot as well, and check for any water stains that might indicate leaking pipes.  Buyers will look in most cabinets, and will notice any telltale signs of damage.

 

Closets:

  • Go through all clothes and shoes.  If you don’t wear something anymore, get rid of it.  We all have those clothes, too, that we wear only once in awhile, but can’t bear to give away.  Box these items and keep them in the storage unit for a few months. 
  • Go through all other personal items in the closet.  Be ruthless.  Weed out everything you don’t absolutely need.
  • Remove any unsightly boxes from the back of the closet.  Put them in storage if need be.  Get everything off the floor.  Closets should look as though they have enough room to hold additional items.

 

Furniture:

  • You may want to tour a few model homes in order to gauge the type of

furniture chosen by design teams to create a spacious, yet comfortable atmosphere.  Note how that furniture is arranged to cultivate a certain feeling.

  • After having armed yourself with some ideas, stand back and look at each

of your rooms.  What will you need to remove?  Remember, most homes contain too much furniture for showings.  These are items that you’ve grown comfortable with and that have become incorporated into your everyday routine.  However, each room should offer a sense of spaciousness, so some furniture will likely need to be placed in storage.

 

Storage Areas:

  • Basements, garages, attics, and sheds:  these are the “junkyard” areas of

any given home.  It is possible to arrange simple clutter into a certain order, but junk is sent packing to these often-hidden rooms.  First, determine which of these boxes and items you actually need.  Can some of it be sent to the dump once and for all?

  • Hold a Garage Sale.  You’ve heard the saying, “One person’s trash is

another’s treasure.”  Let these items go to a better home.

  • Transfer some items to the rental storage unit.  You’ll want to clear the

storage areas in your house as much as possible, in order for them to appear spacious to potential home-buyers.  Buyers want the reassurance that their own excess belongings will find places for storage in their new home.

 

http://thethorntongroup.ca/featured-real-estate-tip.html

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Hello and thank you for taking the time to read our blog. I did not want to overwhelm my regular blog with a bunch of loose Articles, so I decided to create a separate blog to post them in.  This section will be dedicated to all of the exciting articles that I come across in the news and various sources regarding current real estate trends, developments, and other factors that could or will be affecting the market. Enjoy.

 

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